From the Trenches: 3CX Security

3CX From The Trenches

This past month one of our clients experienced a security compromise with their phone system, where 3 extensions had their credentials swiped. Among the information taken was the remote phone login information, including username, extension and password for their 3CX phone system.

Our first tip off of the attack was the mass amount of international calls being made. We quickly realized that this was not your traditional voicemail attack, or SIP viscous scanner attack because the signature of it was different (more below). To alleviate the situation we immediately changed their login credentials, but to our surprise the attack happened again with the same extensions within minutes of us changing their configuration.

For those of you thinking that the issue can be related to a simple or easy username and password (extension number and a simple 7-digit password), that wouldn’t be the case here. It’s important to note that with 3CX version 15.5 and higher, the login credentials are randomized and do not include the extension id, which makes it a lot harder to guess or brute force attack.

We locked down International dialing while we investigated the issue, and our next target was the server’s operating system. We wasted hours sifting through the logs to see if there were any signs of attack, but absolutely none were present. We next checked the firewall and again saw no signs of attack– so how was this happening? How were they able to figure out the user ID and password so quickly and without triggering the built-in protections that 3CX has, like blacklisting IP addresses and preventing password guessing attempts?

Right back to square one, we needed more information. After contacting different contacts of the client, we found out that the three extensions were present at an International venue, which interestingly enough, was the target of all the International calls!!! Phew, finally a decent clue. Under the assumption of a rogue wireless access point present at the hotel, we asked them to switch to VPN before using their extension, which stopped any new authentication fields from being guessed  – – –

While we were able to get our client up and running again, there was something a bit more interesting going on here. The hackers were using a program to establish connections and then use those connections to allow people to dial an International country on the cheap (margins here are extraordinary). That program is using an identifier “user_agent” when establishing a connection to make the calls. If we filter for that, they will have to redo their programming before they can launch the attack again, which proved to be a quick and instantaneous end to this attack irrespective of source– even if they acquire the necessary credentials.

Here’s how I would deal with this next time, in 3CX you can follow the following steps:

Go to

  1. Settings
  2. Parameters

 

 

 

 

 

3. Filter for “user_agent”

 

4. Add the user agent used (The Signature) in the attack to either fields and restart services

Eg. The Signature (Ozeki, Gbomba, Mizuphone)

 


Please share your experience and or opinions with me at

uhoulila@crossrealms.com